Election Law, Politics, and Theory

Series editor: David Schultz, Hamline University Graduate School of Management and University of Minnesota Law School

Election Law, Politics, and Theory

Cover images from selected titles in this series

Books in Election Law, Politics, and Theory
  • Election Law, Politics, and Theory broadly examines election law at the national, subnational, and international or comparative levels. Titles in the series provide both empirical and theoretical analysis of topics and issues that affect voting, campaigns, and elections, and as such offer coverage of political as well as legal concerns and controversies. Useful for scholars, researchers, and practitioners in the field, volumes address such subjects as voting rights, reapportionment, ballot access, campaign finance reform, the courts and election regulation, and the role of actors including political parties and the media. The series' ultimate goal is to build scholarship in this key area by seeking to understand how elections function in an increasingly complex, technological, and global community, and the ways in which election law impacts outcomes, disputes, and eventually governance in particular nations and societies.
  • About the series editor: David Schultz is a professor in the Hamline University Graduate School of Management, and holds an appointment at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he teaches election law, state constitutional law, and legal ethics, and where he is a senior fellow at the Institute on Law and Politics. He is the author or editor of more than 25 books and 50-plus articles on various aspects of election law, campaign and elections, and American politics, as well as coauthor of a leading text on political theory and the author/editor of numerous encyclopedias on law.